The Hour-Glass Bottle

Daisies and Coca-Cola bottles make a great pair.

I’m an unabashed Pepsi drinker—that is, when I do drink a soda, which again, isn’t very often. Cola-Cola is a bit too sweet for my palate. Inexplicably, I detect a flavor of cumin in it.

A limited edition aluminum Coca-Cola bottle.
A limited edition aluminum Coca-Cola bottle.

Yet, on a day of infernal heat, I ducked into a Duane Reade for a brief respite from the unseasonably hot July Sun. There, in the cooler, I found this aluminum bottle.

Back home, I took to Google. I got interested in the evolution of the Cola-Cola bottle.

The Hutchinson bottle.
The Hutchinson bottle.

The first Coca-Cola bottles were the Hutchinson bottles, which were in circulation between the mid-1890s and very early 20th century. It was these that gave “soda pop” its name. They didn’t have caps or crowns, but sealed stoppers. When opened, they made a popping sound. The word Coca-Cola was embossed in either block print or in script lettering, and it designated the city where the bottle was filled.

The "contour bottle" made its debut in 1915.
The “contour bottle” made its debut in 1915.

The famous “contour bottle” was designed in 1915 by the Root Glass Company, and is inspired by the shape of the cocoa pod.

By the time, the year 1994 rolled around, the Coca-Cola bottle had lost its slim, hour-glass shape and become a bloated polymer tank.

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