The Dog Days

Trolley car No. 311 at the car barn of the Williamsburg Bridge trolley line, photographed on March 22, 1928.
Trolley car No. 311 at the car barn of the Williamsburg Bridge trolley line, photographed on March 22, 1928.

Back in the days before air conditioners jutted out of every window in the Big Apple, how did everyone cope with the heat? To escape the ovens that their apartments became on the hottest days, they’d hop into the mass transit of the day: trolleys.

“They’d simply pay a nickel and ride around aimlessly for a couple of hours to cool off,” writes Arthur Miller, in The New Yorker piece, “Before Air-Conditioning.”

Fast-forward to the present.

Seamless Subway Ad 1

Seamless Subway Ad 2

This summer was brutal. Not only did the mercury rise uncomfortably high, topping at 106 degrees Fahrenheit, but it also stayed elevated for an unusually long stretch.

It was during that spell of skin-burning temperature that I saw these clever ads on subway cars. Created by Seamless, a digital food delivery service, they capitalized on the intolerable weather, giving consumers a very good reason to use their service.

h/t: THE NEW YORKER

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