Film

When Time Goes Missing

The Elgin Watch Company was a notable American watchmaker for about 100 years, from 1864 to 1968. Its logo featured Father Time who’s seen in it as having switched his hourglass for a pocket watch.

During the holiday season—a.k.a. the “holy days”—network television programming tends to get pretty lackluster. Unless you happen to stream, there’s not much to be entertained by.

For instance, 40 years after it premiered on CBS, way back in 1976, “Rudolph’s Shiny New Year,” is still telecast every year in and around the time of Christmas. And that’s how I happened to catch it on Boxing Day, last year. I’m glad I did.

A sequel to “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” released in 1964, it’s about a newborn New Year named Happy. Jeered for his oversize ears (a homonym of “years”), he runs away from the Castle of Time and hides out in the “Archipelago of Past Years,” which is, well, a chain of islands, where Older Years retire.

Its treatment of time—that the past is never lost, but is simply, away from the present—is one that would make sense to a string theorist.

If Happy doesn’t return home before midnight on New Year’s Eve, the hands of the clock will be stuck forever on December 31. Time will stop. So, Father Time contacts the gentleman in a red robe and seeks his help in locating Happy. Santa dispatches Rudolph who’s joined in this expedition by agents of Father Time as well.

Fortunately, he’s found. And time goes on.

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Film

Princess Leia: One With The Force

Princess Leia and C-3P0.
Princess Leia and C-3P0.
Carrie Fisher and Harrison Ford reprised their roles as Princess Leia and Han Solo in “The Force Awakens” (2015).
Carrie Fisher and Harrison Ford reprised their roles as Princess Leia and Han Solo in “The Force Awakens” (2015).
Carrie Fisher in 2013.
Carrie Fisher in 2013.
Carrie Fisher speaks onstage during the Wizard World Comic Con, held in Chicago, in August 2016.
Carrie Fisher speaks onstage during the Wizard World Comic Con, held in Chicago, in August 2016.
Ricky LaChance's illustration of Carrie Fisher as Princess Leia in “Star Wars” (left) and Debbie Reynolds as Kathy Selden in “Singin’ in the Rain (1952) (right.)
Ricky LaChance’s illustration of Carrie Fisher as Princess Leia in “Star Wars” (left) and Debbie Reynolds as Kathy Selden in “Singin’ in the Rain (1952) (right.)